Zimbabwe: A Roadmap for Economic Transformation

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Judith Tyson, August 2017
Zimbabwe has suffered from economic decline in the recent past, with a 60% reduction in its gross domestic product over the past two decades. There have been multiple acute crises and a deep structural regression in its economy. This has included deindustrialisation with degradation of capital stock and low capacity utilisation in the manufacturing sector. The paper on ‘A Roadmap for Economic Transformation’ argues that the most viable is a ‘single sector, single agent’ approach – whereby transformation is focused on a single sector with high potential and led by a single reformist agent within government – and this could ‘kick-start’ change.


5 July 2017 | 10 policy priorities for Kenyan manufacturing launch

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Hosted in partnership with the Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM), this launch event saw the introduction to Kenyan policymakers and political leaders of SET and KAM’s recent publication, Ten policy priorities for transforming manufacturing and creating jobs in Kenya. This event featured contributions from Dr Neil Balchin, ODI Research Fellow, KAM’s CEO Phyllis Wakiaga, Vice Chair Sachen Gudka and Chairperson Florence Mutahi, as well as leading economist Anzetse Were. The occasion also saw commitments made by political parties and coalitions to prioritise Kenya’s industrialisation, and the development of the manufacturing sector in particular.


Coordinating Public and Private Action for Export Manufacturing: International Experience and Issues for Rwanda

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David Booth, Linda Calabrese and Frederick Golooba-Mutebi, July 2017

One of the keys to economic transformation across Africa today is a greater role for employment-intensive, export-oriented manufacturing. After taking due account of differences in contexts and time periods, international experience – especially in Asia but also in Africa-region leaders such as Mauritius – points to employment-intensive manufacturing as a crucial and indispensable step in the transition from poverty to development.


Linda Calabrese (ODI) | Four ways to help East African manufacturing

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Linda Calabrese (Senior Research Officer, ODI) 30 June 2017 Manufacturing has finally taken a central place in the policy and economic debate in East Africa. Not so long ago, industrialisation was largely ignored but it is now widely understood that the manufacturing sector is crucial in creating employment and spurring growth in the region. The second East African Manufacturing Business Summit in Kigali brought together regional institutions, national governments and private sector bodies from East African Community (EAC) countries to discuss the future of East African manufacturing.


Financing Manufacturing in Africa: Macroeconomic Conditions and Mobilising Private Finance

Credit: SET Programme, Overseas Development Institute ©

Phyllis Papadavid and Judith Tyson, June 2017

Since the downturn in global commodity prices in 2015, sub-Saharan Africa’s macroeconomic conditions have deteriorated, with 2016 seeing the worst economic growth in more than two decades. To maintain progress in economic transformation, employment-intensive and higher-productivity sectors need to be developed. Manufacturing – including agricultural processing – offers this opportunity, including through participation in regional and global value chains. In order for the sector to get the investment it needs, the promotion and mobilising of private financing will be crucial.


Linda Calabrese & Stephen Gelb (ODI) | Are factory jobs good for the poor? Evidence from Myanmar

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  Linda Calabrese (Senior Research Officer, ODI) & Stephen Gelb (Principal Research Fellow – Team Leader, private sector development, ODI) 27 June 2017 Recently The New York Times published an article by Christopher Blattman (Columbia University) and Stefan Dercon (Oxford University and DFID) questioning the poverty-reduction effect of sweatshop work in developing countries. They carried […]


Financing Manufacturing in Rwanda

The gatsibo Rice Mill in Gatsibo district, Rwanda buys rice from local farmers, and processes it for local consumption. The mill is part of the same government sponsored project that has improved the irrigation infrastructure in the areas to increase productivity.

Linda Calabrese, Phyllis Papadavid and Judith Tyson, June 2017

Rwanda is one of Africa’s “rising stars”. The country’s economy has seen solid rates of economic growth since the civil conflict in the mid-1990s. Strength in investment flows has followed in the path of this macroeconomic and institutional stability. As this paper highlights, a large part of Rwanda’s success has been the result of proactive policies undertaken by the government of Rwanda in facilitating a good domestic investment climate, which have been conducive to strong rates of growth in FDI into the economy.


10 Policy Priorities for Transforming Manufacturing and Creating Jobs in Kenya

Credit: j_cadmus via Visual Hunt

Anzetse Were, Dirk Willem te Velde and Gituro Wainaina, June 2017

Developed by SET in partnership with the Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM), this booklet addresses Kenya’s current economic predicament and makes the case for political and financial investment in manufacturing. The central 10-point policy plan lays out seven policies and regulations that should be enacted to create a conducive environment for manufacturing to flourish, and three further suggestions for how to implement them in practice.


5 June 2017 | ACET PACT Manufacturing Chapter Launch

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Manufacturing is also a key element in the African Development Bank’s Hi-Fives (Industrialize Africa) and a priority area in Goal number two of the African Union’s Vision 2063. ACET in partnership with the Oversees Development Institute (ODI) and the Government of Ethiopia organised the manufacturing chapter meeting of PACT. The aim of the manufacturing meeting was to kick start a continuous conversation for African leaders to shape their countries’ industrialisation issues in the context of Africa’s transformation agenda.


Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Transformation in Myanmar

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Stephen Gelb, Linda Calabrese and Xiaoyang Tang, March 2017, June 2017

The paper and briefing reviews the foreign (Chinese) presence in four sectors in Myanmar and its impact on economic transformation. Significant positive effects include employment and exports in garments, local enterprise development and downstream user costs in construction (and infrastructure), and exports, technology transfer and product market competition in agriculture and agro-processing and finally makes a number of policy recommendations for UK DFID.


Supporting Economic Transformation: An Approach Paper

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Margaret McMillan, John Page, David Booth and Dirk Willem te Velde, March 2017

This approach paper seeks to define economic transformation, offers an approach to measuring progress towards it, and examines case studies from African and Asian economies where transformative policies have been successful to greater and lesser extents. The paper concludes by presenting a multi-disciplinary approach to identifying opportunities, diagnosing constraints and mapping out realistic policy options for countries to use to turn their economic growth into genuine transformation.