Using Data to Assess the Contribution of Development Finance Institutions to Economic Transformation

Alberto Lemma, October 2018

Recent studies have analysed the investment activities of development finance institutions (DFIs), attempting to understand if these are, or could be, contributing to economic transformation. DFIs frequently report their portfolio activities, including the sectoral composition, and employment and gross value added (GVA) data can be used to compute sectoral productivity level at sector level and over time. When combined, such data help us understand if DFI investments are targeting sectors that have higher productivity or activities to increase productivity levels within a sector.

Alberto Lemma, October 2018

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Recent studies have analysed the investment activities of development finance institutions (DFIs), attempting to understand if these are, or could be, contributing to economic transformation. DFIs frequently report their portfolio activities, including the sectoral composition, and employment and gross value added (GVA) data can be used to compute sectoral productivity level at sector level and over time. When combined, such data help us understand if DFI investments are targeting sectors that have higher productivity or activities to increase productivity levels within a sector.

Photo: Ethiopia, 2008. Antony Robbins. License: CC BY-NC 2.0.

Large and Mega-Projects in Mozambique: Negotiations Management for Creating Linkages and Jobs in Manufacturing

Peter E. Coughlin, October 2018
Since the Lusaka Peace Accords of 1992, Mozambique has relied heavily on large and mega-investments by multinational corporations to spur economic transformation in manufacturing. This has entailed negotiations that have often been from an ill-prepared and professionally and competitively disadvantaged position.
To understand what has been done well or badly and what can be learnt to improve the country’s negotiation capabilities and the consequent benefits, this study examines six negotiations for large and mega-projects with investors in sectors outside of coal and gas mining—namely aluminium, aluminium rods and cables, steel, petroleum refining, transport vehicles and beverages. Though the document files for these cases are far from complete, their analysis revealed major structural, technical and legal deficiencies affecting the ability of Mozambique’s negotiators to shape agreements for large and mega-projects to best promote jobs, upstream and downstream linkages and economic and social development.

Peter E. Coughlin, October 2018

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Since the Peace Accords of 1992, Mozambique has relied heavily on large and mega-investments by multinational corporations to spur economic transformation in manufacturing. This has entailed negotiations that have often been from an ill-prepared and professionally and competitively disadvantaged position.

To understand what has been done well or badly and what can be learnt to improve the country’s negotiation capabilities and the consequent benefits, this study examines six negotiations for large and mega-projects with investors in sectors outside of coal and gas mining—namely aluminium, aluminium rods and cables, steel, petroleum refining, transport vehicles and beverages. Though the document files for these cases are far from complete, their analysis revealed major structural, technical and legal deficiencies affecting the ability of Mozambique’s negotiators to shape agreements for large and mega-projects to best promote jobs, upstream and downstream linkages and economic and social development.

Photo: Maputo, Mozambique. Via Pexels. 

4 October 2018 | Financing Tanzania’s Five-Year Development Plan 2016/17 – 2020/21

The Tanzanian government laid out ambitious industrialisation goals in its Five-Year Development Plan (FYDP II) 2016/17 – 2020/21, and the subsequent implementation plan. However, for those goals to be realised, progress must be made in a number of key development projects identified in the plan across the energy, transport, industry, agriculture, and minerals sectors. The challenge for the government lies in garnering sufficient finance from the private sector to move these projects forward.
This high-level workshop, hosted by the government of Tanzania and ODI, aims to address this challenge by bringing together government and potential investors and financiers to discuss constraints to financing for the key projects and to explore how, through public-private partnerships and other mechanisms, Tanzania’s industrialisation vision can be realised.

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The Tanzanian government laid out ambitious industrialisation goals in its Five-Year Development Plan (FYDP II) 2016/17 – 2020/21, and the subsequent implementation plan. However, for those goals to be realised, progress must be made in a number of key development projects identified in the plan across the energy, transport, industry, agriculture, and minerals sectors. The challenge for the government lies in garnering sufficient finance from the private sector to move these projects forward.

This technical working session, hosted by the government of Tanzania and ODI, aimed to address this challenge by bringing together government and potential investors and financiers to discuss constraints to financing for the key projects and to explore how, through public-private partnerships and other mechanisms, Tanzania’s industrialisation vision can be realised.

Photo: Tanzania’s new bus transit system, 2016. World Bank. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

Financing Special Economic Zones: Different Models of Financing and Public Policy Support

Judith E. Tyson, September 2018

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A special economic zone (SEZ) is a piece of serviced land, typically industrial, that provides infrastructure and connectivity for private firms investing within it. Such zones can support economic transformation in developing countries by helping to overcome some of the typical constraints to private firms’ growth, such as the high-cost of energy and poor-quality infrastructure.

However, SEZs have a mixed history of success. Risks associated with their implementation are greater in developing countries where the institutional environment is weaker, including in relation to government capacity, legal and regulatory frameworks and construction capabilities.

This paper focuses on one aspect of SEZ execution – their financing. The purpose is to provide guidance on financing options and their advantages and disadvantages. The paper includes case studies on existing SEZ financing and examines in detail the possibilities for private financing of SEZs.

Photo: A woman irons fabric at a garments factory at the Sihanoukville special economic zone, Cambodia, 2013. Chhor Sokunthea / World Bank. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

5-6 June 2018 | Financing the development of special economic zones in Tanzania

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Tanzania has registered relatively little progress to date in establishing industrial parks and special economic zones (SEZs). None of the SEZ projects included in the country’s Second Five-Year Development Plan (FYDP II) have yet been realised. SEZs and industrial parks were not mentioned in the Minister of Finance and Planning’s latest speech to present the estimates of government revenue and expenditure for 2018/19, and the government appears to be prioritising spending on other infrastructure development over zones.

Instead, the private sector is increasingly expected to step in to develop new zones. Securing the necessary finance to develop these zones still appears to be challenging, although negotiations to attract investment into certain zones, such as the Bagamoyo Port project, are more advanced.

Against this backdrop, the SET  programme held a two-day workshop in Dar es Salaam on 5–6 June 2018 to discuss options for financing the development of SEZs and related infrastructure in Tanzania.

The workshop agenda and focus were designed in collaboration with Tanzania’s Export Processing Zones Authority (EPZA). It was attended by a range of different stakeholders, including representatives of Tanzanian development finance institutions, Tanzania’s Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment (through the ministry’s Textile Development Unit) and a range of external experts with knowledge of, or interest in, financing and other elements of developing industrial parks and SEZs in Tanzania and elsewhere in the East African region.

Photo: Dar es Salaam waterfront, 2017. David Stanley via Flickr. CC BY 2.0.

10 September 2018 | Kick-Starting Economic Transformation in Rwanda: Main Takeaways

Rwanda has committed itself to economic transformation as a pillar of its seven-year government programme, the National Strategy for Transformation (NST, 2017-24). The strategy has at its core the goal of generating 214,000 new jobs per year for the next seven years.
On 10 September 2018, the Rwandan Ministry of Trade and Industry (MINICOM) and the Supporting Economic Transformation (SET) team hosted a high-level roundtable: ‘Kick-starting Rwanda’s economic transformation: what needs to be done, when and by whom?’.

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Rwanda has committed itself to economic transformation as a pillar of its seven-year government programme, the National Strategy for Transformation (NST, 2017-24). The strategy has at its core the goal of generating 214,000 new jobs per year for the next seven years.

On 10 September 2018, the Rwandan Ministry of Trade and Industry (MINICOM) and the Supporting Economic Transformation (SET) team hosted a high-level roundtable: ‘Kick-starting Rwanda’s economic transformation: what needs to be done, when and by whom?’.

The objective of the roundtable was to stimulate discussion of the practical questions raised by the SET research programme, as set out in the briefing paper: Kick-starting economic transformation in Rwanda: four policy lessons and their implications.

Photo: Kigali factory, 2010. George Barya/Commonwealth Secretariat via Flickr. CC BY-NC 2.0.

17 July 2018 | Financing Garment Manufacturing in Kenya

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On 17 July 2018, the SET programme at ODI, in partnership with the Kenyan Ministry of Industry, Trade and Cooperatives, convened a group of manufacturing firms, financers, Government representatives and others, to discuss Kenyan manufacturing within the industrialisation ‘pillar’ of President Kenyatta’s ‘Big Four’ agenda, and opportunities and challenges in the financing of textiles and garment manufacturing.

The workshop sought to bring firms and potential investors together to talk through constraints on both sides, and to begin to build relationships to support investments in the long term.

Photo: Dominic Chavez/World Bank.

8 August 2018 | Presentation | Skills Development Funds: Lessons from Asia

The SET programme is working with the Aung Myin Hmu (AMH) Garment Skills Training Centre, based in Yangon, Myanmar, to support its long-term sustainability, and to influence the development of the Myanmar Government’s skills development law, specifically a proposed skills development fund (SDF). Initial analysis of SDF models in other Asian countries was presented to stakeholders including senior figures at the Myanmar Ministry of Labour, Immigration and Population (MOLIP) at a meeting in Yangon in August 2018. Following the meeting, a multi-stakeholder SDF Technical Committee was set up by MOLIP, and Dr Krishnan addressed its first meeting on 11 August.

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The SET programme is working with the Aung Myin Hmu (AMH) Garment Skills Training Centre, based in Yangon, Myanmar, to support its long-term sustainability, and to influence the development of the Myanmar Government’s skills development law, specifically a proposed skills development fund (SDF).

Initial analysis of SDF models in other Asian countries was presented to stakeholders including senior figures at the Myanmar Ministry of Labour, Immigration and Population (MOLIP) at a meeting in Yangon in August 2018. Following the meeting, a multi-stakeholder SDF Technical Committee was set up by MOLIP, and Dr Krishnan addressed its first meeting on 11 August.

A final report, drawing out lessons specifically for policymakers in Myanmar, will be presented to government and other stakeholders in September 2018.

Photo: Shopkeeper working in a souvenir shop at the Bogyoke Market in Yangon. Asian Development Bank via Flickr. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. 

Measuring the Potential Contribution of Development Finance Institutions to Economic Transformation

Alberto Lemma, September 2018

With the UK Department for International Development (DFID) channelling increasing amounts of UK Aid through development finance institutions (DFIs) as part of the department’s core goal of reducing poverty, it is important to evaluate the extent to which the investments made by DFIs are contributing to economic transformation.

Alberto Lemma, September 2018

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Economic transformation is defined as the continuous process of moving labour and other resources from low- to high-productivity sectors (structural change) and raising within-sector productivity growth. Evidence suggests the economic transformation of developing countries drives job creation and improves livelihoods by increasing per capita incomes.

With the UK Department for International Development (DFID) channelling increasing amounts of UK Aid through development finance institutions (DFIs) as part of the department’s core goal of reducing poverty, it is important to evaluate the extent to which the investments made by DFIs are contributing to economic transformation.

This report provides an overview of the economic transformation potential of DFIs (focusing on DFID’s strategic priority DFIs – the CDC Group UK and the International Finance Corporation) based on publicly available portfolio data. It finds some exposure and capacity to channel investments towards economic transformation sectors. Finally, the report proposes 13 indicators that DFIs could use to assess the transformational potential of their investments. Such indicators can be used both ex-ante for investment decision-making and ex-post for impact monitoring and evaluation.

Photo: The port at Tema, Ghana. Jonathan Ernst / World Bank, 2006.
Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

20 July 2018 | Kenya Trade Week & Exposition Breakfast: Launch of Kenya-UK Trade Study

On 20th July 2018, the Kenyan Export Promotion Council (EPC) hosted the breakfast launch of SET’s latest report, Kenya-UK trade and investment relations: taking stock and promoting exports to the UK.  The event also served as the opening of the EPC’s Trade Week, to celebrate 25 years of promoting Kenya’s exports.

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On 20th July, the Kenyan Export Promotion Council (EPC) hosted the breakfast launch of SET’s latest report, Kenya-UK trade and investment relations: taking stock and promoting exports to the UK.  The event also served as the opening of the EPC’s Trade Week, to celebrate 25 years of promoting Kenya’s exports.

Media coverage

‘Government urges exporters to rebrand products’, KBC Channel, 20 July

‘Kenya’s share of UK market shrinks by 13.2 per cent’, Mediamax Network, 20 July

‘Kenya’s UK export slack opens door to regional rivals’, Citizen Digital, 20 July

‘Rwanda, Ethiopia edge out Kenya in UK trade’, The Star (Kenya), 21 July

‘Kenya loses market share to Rwanda, Dar’, Rwanda Today, 23 July (also printed in Business Daily Africa)

‘Kenya losing her UK-market to neighbouring countries’, Soko Directory, 23 July

‘Kenya’s export value to UK declining’, Kenyan Citizen TV (via YouTube)

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‘Brexit offers Kenya an opportunity to negotiate beneficial trade deals’, Business Daily Africa (via YouTube)

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Photo credit: EPC. All rights reserved.

 

Kenya-UK Trade and Investment Relations: Taking Stock and Promoting Exports to the UK

Aarti Krishnan, Dirk Willem te Velde and Anzetse Were, July 2018

The UK and Kenya have historically close trade and investment ties; however, both the value of Kenyan exports to the UK and Kenya’s share of the UK’s imports have been declining for a decade, with regional competitors such as Rwanda and Ethiopia capturing Kenya’s market share in key export products like tea, coffee, fresh vegetables and cut flowers. This paper explores the state of UK-Kenya trade and sets out recommendations to support Kenya to regain competitiveness and increase its share of UK imports.

Aarti Krishnan, Dirk Willem te Velde and Anzetse Were, July 2018

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The UK and Kenya have historically close trade and investment ties; however, both the value of Kenyan exports to the UK and Kenya’s share of the UK’s imports have been declining for a decade, with regional competitors such as Rwanda and Ethiopia capturing Kenya’s market share in key export products like tea, coffee, fresh vegetables and cut flowers.

This research, produced in partnership with the Kenyan Export Promotion Council to inform its new export strategy, explores the current state of trade patterns and investment flows between the two countries and proposes a prioritisation tool to help policymakers identify promising products and sectors for export. The report posits that unless Kenya diversifies its export offer and improves the quality and marketing of its existing core export products, it will continue to lose out to its trading competitors.

Media coverage

‘High costs taking shine off tea, coffee exports to UK’, Daily Nation, 17 May (also published by Business Daily Africa)

‘High production costs could lose Kenya its competitive edge in coffee, tea and flower exports to the UK’, Brits in Kenya, 30 May

‘Government urges exporters to rebrand products’, KBC Channel, 20 July

‘Kenya’s share of UK market shrinks by 13.2 per cent’, Mediamax Network, 20 July

‘Kenya’s UK export slack opens door to regional rivals’, Citizen Digital, 20 July

‘Rwanda, Ethiopia edge out Kenya in UK trade’, The Star (Kenya), 21 July

‘Kenya loses market share to Rwanda, Dar’, Rwanda Today, 23 July (also printed in Business Daily Africa)

‘Kenya losing her UK-market to neighbouring countries’, Soko Directory, 23 July

‘Kenya’s export value to UK declining’, Kenyan Citizen TV (via YouTube)

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‘Brexit offers Kenya an opportunity to negotiate beneficial trade deals’, Business Daily Africa (via YouTube)

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‘Kenya-UK trade activities suffer glitches due to new policies’, Standard Media, 25 July

 

Photo credit: Pete Lewis/Department for International Development via Flickr

Phyllis Papadavid (ODI) | Kenya needs to gear up its macroeconomy to boost its manufacturing sector

Phyllis Papadavid (Senior Research Fellow – Team Leader of International Macroeconomics, ODI) 

19 July 2018

Kenya needs to gear up its macroeconomy to boost its manufacturing sector

Kenya has a compelling story to tell when it comes to its economic diversification. The country has sizeable agriculture and services sectors, which account for a respective 32% and 45% of total value added in the economy, according to the World Bank. And, with the introduction of its Early Oil Pilot Scheme, it is also now an oil-exporting economy, drawing production from its Turkana region.

At the same time, having been identified as a priority sector under the government’s Big 4 Agenda, manufacturing, and the textiles and apparels (T&A) sub-sector in particular, could be a game-changer for economic transformation and job creation – if close attention is paid to the country’s macroeconomic environment.

The time for diversification is opportune, given the current challenging environment for resource-based economies, owing in part to the commodity price downturn since mid-2014: inward foreign direct investment (FDI) into Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) declined from $53bn in 2016 to $41bn in 2017. For example, Nigeria’s economy in particular continued to be depressed, with FDI down 21% in 2017 relative to 2016. By contrast, the more diversified economies of East Africa have shown more resilience of late. At $3.5bn in 2017, FDI inflows in Ethiopia continue to be nearly double the level seen in 2014 (Figure 1), and the country is the second largest recipient of investment inflows in Africa, owing in part to its apparel sector.

Figure 1: FDI inflows in selected SSA economies ($mn)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: UNCTAD World Investment Report Annex Tables

A conducive macroeconomic environment is key for diversification

Kenya is already the largest exporter of apparels under the African Growth and Opportunity Act, according to the Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM), which makes the sector a key one for the future. The country has seen phenomenal growth: US imports of Kenyan apparel products increased 675% between 2000 and 2017. Exports to the US market are also crucial for the sector, given the dominance of textiles compared with other industries. Pursuing further expansion in this largely labour-intensive sector could help reduce Kenya’s youth unemployment rate, which, at 26%, is one of the highest in SSA. Such investment could also catalyse Kenya’s growth at a time when the textiles, clothing and leather sector has doubled its global share of greenfield FDI projects, according to the UN Conference on Trade and Development.

Kenya’s success in diversifying depends in part on its cultivating a conducive macroeconomic environment – and there are three important pathways to follow in this regard (in addition to paying attention to a range of other factors explained in last year’s KAM-ODI booklet):

Three pathways to boost diversification into Kenyan textiles

Complementary industries

Kenya’s information and communication technologies (ICT) sector has seen significant growth, with innovations such as M-Pesa leading its domestic financial services development. In 2017, the economy saw a 71% increase in FDI as a result of inflows into ICT. This owed in part to its investment climate and particularly the construction of Konza Technology City, which has attracted major corporations such as Microsoft and Oracle. Despite this, a digital divide persists: although almost 90% of Kenyan manufacturing firms have computers and internet, only 50% have a web presence, only 40% have an IT policy and only 27% use the internet to sell online.[1] Increased use of ICT will enable both large T&A companies and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to participate in digital supply chains and function more efficiently.

Meanwhile, when it comes to investment inflows, Kenya can leverage its growing domestic retail sector, and domestic growth in consumer demand, to spur local and international investment. This could be important at a time when the return to FDI has halved in SSA, from roughly 12.3% in 2012 to 6.3% in 2017. Additionally, wages for Kenya’s garment workers are cited as much costlier than those in, for example, Ethiopia. This is notwithstanding Kenya’s labour productivity significantly outstripping Ethiopia’s, when looking at the experience of Hela Garment factories in both countries. Expected retail demand growth could mean that Kenya attracts market-seeking FDI, to serve the domestic market, which would offset any weakness in FDI that targets cheap inputs.

Finally, Kenya’s logistics sector, in transporting and warehousing goods, stands to benefit its T&A sector. In particular, upgrading its railway and transport sector closer to international standards will facilitate greater commerce; Kenya’s logistics ‘giant’, Siginon Group, cites this as an obstacle. Together with Kenya’s industrial and technology parks, this will continue to contribute to Kenya becoming a ‘logistics hub’ and creating more logistics companies through clustering. The emergent knowledge economy will have knock-on effects on T&A, as a result of better support to knowledge uptake by Kenya’s industry. This should be founded on wider partnerships, to include universities. The experience of other success stories suggests that successful economic clustering depends on – among other things – the inclusion of research institutes for enhanced innovation and sophistication of local companies.

A reduction in the shilling’s real effective exchange rate

Kenya does not fare well in terms of currency developments. Having a fairly priced trade-weighted exchange rate is important to source affordable imports – which Kenya’s T&A manufacturers have consistently cited as a key cost. In particular, for the larger companies, the high cost of imported material is significant. Although the shilling continues to depreciate against the US dollar – a key export market for Kenya – the real effective exchange rate (REER) is historically high, raising questions around Kenya’s competitiveness. Its REER has appreciated by 27% since 2014, putting it roughly 34% above its long-term average and suggesting overvaluation against its trading partners’ currencies (Figure 2).[2]

Figure 2: Kenyan shilling real effective exchange rate

 

 

 

 

 

Source: World Bank World Development Indicators, Bloomberg.

Broader access to finance

Elevated overhead costs in the sector and lack of collateral have also restrained access to finance. High interest rates and the short time horizons available for loans are key obstacles, according to KAM. Equally, Kenya’s current interest rate cap has disincentivised banks to lend to SMEs and to small manufacturers, in that they cannot obtain a high enough return to match perceived risk associated with SMEs. The Central Bank of Kenya reports that banks reduced credit provision to the private sector following the cap, with few expectations of a re-acceleration. A silver lining is that domestic banks, rather than foreign banks, are increasingly driving SME lending.

Targeted programmes, such as those of Equity Bank, instituting the Maridadi Business credit facility of between Sh5,000 and Sh100mn for Kenya’s T&A SMEs, fashion designers and tailors, have been encouraging. The facility’s aim of targeting businesses and entrepreneurs along the entire value chain has been lauded as a particularly strong feature, given Kenya’s need to import fabrics. The higher risk profile of smaller SMEs has led other domestic banks to pair with public institutions, such as the International Finance Corporation, to lend to SMEs. Kenya’s second largest bank – the Co-op Bank – has received a $105mn loan for Kenya’s micro, small and medium-sized enterprises.

Kenya’s macroeconomic challenges and opportunities need to be squared with the government’s ambitious plans in its Big 4 Agenda – which include employing 50,000 young adults and women in the T&A sector, increasing revenue exponentially from the textile industry from Sh3.5bn to Sh2tr and creating 500,000 cotton jobs and 100,000 new clothes jobs by 2022. In order to achieve this, the domestic macroeconomic environment will have to be recalibrated to foster increased competitiveness, more affordable access to finance and continued attention to incentivising diversified investment inflows.

[1] Banga, K. and te Velde, D.W. (2018) ‘Digitalisation and the future of manufacturing in Africa’. London: ODI, SET Programme.

[2] Kenyan REER overvaluation is calculated as the percentage deviation of the current REER from its average since 2000. The REER is calculated using the World Bank World Development Indicator database and Bloomberg data.

 

 

Photo credit: Brian Snelson via Flickr

Recent Progress Towards Industrialisation in Tanzania

Professor Amon Mbelle and Hafidh Kabanda (Economic and Social Research Foundation), July 2018

Tanzania has set an ambitious industrialisation agenda in pursuit of the goals articulated in the TDV 2025. The observed status and performance of industry is partly a consequence of past policies, plans and strategies. The FYDP II and its accompanying Implementation Strategy have revitalised the industrialisation agenda by articulating concrete interventions. This briefing provides an update on recent industrialisation progress in Tanzania, with a particular focus on the status of the manufacturing sector.

Professor Amon Mbelle and Hafidh Kabanda (Economic and Social Research Foundation), July 2018

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Tanzania has set an ambitious industrialisation agenda in pursuit of the goals articulated in the TDV 2025. The observed status and performance of industry is partly a consequence of past policies, plans and strategies. The FYDP II and its accompanying Implementation Strategy have revitalised the industrialisation agenda by articulating concrete interventions. This briefing provides an update on recent industrialisation progress in Tanzania, with a particular focus on the status of the manufacturing sector. It draws on recent statistics for relevant industrialisation indicators, using both national and international data.

This briefing is part of a series produced by SET in collaboration with the Tanzania Economic & Social Research Foundation (ESRF). The first three briefings are:

1)  A summary of FYDP II

2) A summary of FYDP II implementation strategy including actions and financing, and progress so far

3) A briefing linking FYDP II and the implementation strategies to other important actors (including donors/private sector).

This briefing was prepared by Professor Amon Mbelle and Hafidh Kabanda (ESRF) with input from Neil Balchin and Dirk Willem te Velde (ODI).

Photo credit: SET Programme, Overseas Development Institute ©

Manufacturing in Africa: Factors for Success

Neil Balchin, Karishma Banga , Sonia Hoque and Dirk Willem te Velde, June 2018

Many African countries have a desire to industrialise, as witnessed in national and regional policy statements. Significant progress is being made in selected countries (e.g. real manufacturing value added grew at around or more than 7% annually over 2005–2015 in Ethiopia, Rwanda and Tanzania). However, without a greater practical focus on implementing a consistent strategy to promote manufacturing, many African countries will miss the significant opportunities presented by their comparative and natural advantages, rising wages in Asia and growing regional markets.

Neil Balchin, Karishma Banga Sonia Hoque and Dirk Willem te Velde, June 2018

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This paper was launched at the ACET Manufacturing Chapter third working session. More information on the Chapter, including previous sessions, can be viewed here.

Moving labour out of low-productivity agriculture and into higher-productivity manufacturing is crucial for structural change in Africa. Expanding manufacturing production and exports, and increasing their sophistication, can drive industrialisation and create much-needed jobs. Indeed, export-led manufacturing is the only proven model to drive economic transformation and boost employment. This is evident in the experiences of many Asian countries, which show that export-intensive manufacturing can generate significant numbers of jobs. Countries such as Bangladesh, China, Malaysia and Vietnam have developed light manufacturing – by building textiles and garment industries – to kick-start industrialisation.

Many African countries have a desire to industrialise, as witnessed in national and regional policy statements. Significant progress is being made in selected countries (e.g. real manufacturing value added grew at around or more than 7% annually over 2005–2015 in Ethiopia, Rwanda and Tanzania). However, without a greater practical focus on implementing a consistent strategy to promote manufacturing, many African countries will miss the significant opportunities presented by their comparative and natural advantages, rising wages in Asia and growing regional markets.

This paper discusses key characteristics of a good industrial policy regime and factors behind effective implementation. It also uncovers a range of successes. Using country examples, we recognise that, while there are broad commonalities, the specifics will always vary across different contexts.

Photo credit: Factory workers producing fruit drinks at Blue Skies, in Accra, Ghana on October 13, 2015. Dominic Chavez/World Bank via Flickr

Kick-Starting Economic Transformation in Rwanda: Four Policy Lessons and their Implications

David Booth, Linda Calabrese and Frederick Golooba-Mutebi, June 2018

Rwanda has committed itself to economic transformation as a pillar of the current seven-year government programme, the National Strategy for Transformation (NSTP1, 2017-24). Whether the country succeeds in this endeavour will depend in good part on whether it learns a small set of key policy lessons from international experience in economic transformation. This briefing sets out four such lessons, drawing on the most distinguished global thinking on the subject, as well as past research on Rwanda by the SET programme.

David Booth, Linda Calabrese and Frederick Golooba-Mutebi, June 2018

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Rwanda has committed itself to economic transformation as a pillar of the current seven-year government programme, the National Strategy for Transformation (NSTP1, 2017-24). Whether the country succeeds in this endeavour will depend in good part on whether it learns a small set of key policy lessons from international experience in economic transformation.

This briefing sets out four such lessons, drawing on the most distinguished global thinking on the subject, as well as past research on Rwanda by the SET programme:

(i) Specialising wisely

(ii) Clustering and concentrating

(iii) Coordinating foreign and domestic capabilities

(iv) Organising for steering and learning.

 

Photo credit: Sarah Farhat/World Bank. Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

Five Policy Priorities to Facilitate East African Trade and Investment

With 3.9 million people predicted to join the labour market each year from now until 2030, there is a huge jobs challenge facing the East African Community (EAC): the creation of 7,000 jobs per day.
SET has worked with the East African Business Council (EABC) to develop a five-point plan for EAC governments to increase investment and intra-EAC trade and in doing so, help tackle the jobs crisis. The plan launches at the EABC’s 22nd anniversary celebrations in Nairobi. 

With 3.9 million people predicted to join the labour market each year from now until 2030, there is a huge jobs challenge facing the East African Community (EAC): the creation of 7,000 jobs per day.

SET has worked with the East African Business Council (EABC) to develop a five-point plan for EAC governments to increase investment and intra-EAC trade and in doing so, help tackle the jobs crisis:

  1. Eliminate non-tariff barriers to trade
  2. Reform the EAC Common External Tariff
  3. Improve regional infrastructure
  4. Fast track liberation of intra-EAC services trade
  5. Promote local sourcing

Further reading:

Balchin, N., Hoekman, B., Martin, H., Mendez-Parra, M. , Papadavid, P., Primack, D. and te Velde, D.W. (2016) Trade in services and economic transformation. SET Report. London: Overseas Development Institute (ODI) (https://set.odi.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/SET-Trade-in-Services-and-Economic-Transformation_Final-Nov2016.pdf).

Eberhard-Ruiz, A. and Calabrese, L. (2017) Trade facilitation, transport costs and the price of trucking services in East Africa. ODI Working Paper. London:  ODI (https://www.odi.org/publications/10868-trade-facilitation-transport-costs-and-price-trucking-services-east-africa).

Gasiorek, M., Mendez-Parra, M. and Willenbockel, D. (2017) ‘The costs of logistical and transport barriers to trade in East Africa’. ODI Briefing Paper. London: ODI (https://www.odi.org/publications/10816-costs-logistical-and-transport-barriers-trade-east-africa).

te Velde, D. W. (2017) ‘Supporting Kenya’s industrialisation: Mombasa port, SEZs and targeted development cooperation’. Supporting Economic Transformation (SET) Blog. London: ODI (https://set.odi.org/supporting-kenyas-industrialisation-mombasa-sezs-development/).

UNDESA Population Division (2017) World population prospects: the 2017 revision. DVD Edition.

The East African (2017) ‘Disputes are eroding intra-EAC trade gains’. 11 December (http://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/business/Disputes-are-eroding-intra-EAC-trade-gains-/2560-4223074-nr3bvd/index.html).

 

Photo credit: Salahaldeen Nadir / World Bank. License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

Max Mendez-Parra (ODI) | The African Continental Free Trade Area and economic transformation

Max Mendez-Parra  (Senior Research Fellow, ODI)

22 March 2018

African leaders gathered this week in Kigali to sign the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA). This is a key step in African efforts to eliminate barriers to trade among countries of the continent and will provide the foundations for smarter and deeper continental integration and implementation of the AU 2063 agenda.

Africa has followed a long road in its endeavours to promote regional integration, with mixed success. For example, the East African Community now constitutes the most successful model of integration on the continent, but other regional economic communities (RECs) have experienced more nuanced outcomes – and the EAC also had its challenges in the 1960s and 1970s. In addition, economic partnership agreements (EPAs) between African groups of countries and the EU have been a challenge to the African regional integration process, as EPAs cut across Africa and African regions.

The road to full implementation of the AfCTFA will be very long. Stage 1 of the negotiations seeks to establish a free trade area within Africa by liberalising nearly 90% of the goods within the continent. For some countries (e.g. Nigeria), reaching such a level of liberalisation constitutes a major effort. The agreement includes a services chapter, aimed at liberalising continental trade in services. This stage of the agreement will enter into force once 15 countries ratify it. It is unclear how long this process may take.

The second stage of the negotiations will aim to address deep integration issues such as investment and competition policies. Later on, there will be the possibility of forming a customs union, but at the moment a decision on this is not possible.

The AfCFTA is set within the aim of the AU and its member states to transform the economic structure of African countries and increase intra-African trade. Economic transformation and the creation of jobs is the most important economic development need in Africa today. Trade and trade facilitation is a key component of economic transformation strategies. Within economic transformation, the development and improvement of the manufacturing sector remains key, and trade can contribute to it. The AfCFTA could contribute to this goal by promoting regional value chains making use of expanded market access in the region.

The AfCFTA should be the basis for a wider and more comprehensive integration strategy. The AfCFTA is likely to be expanded to include additional trade and other cooperation provisions. In particular, the AfCFTA should be used to boost investment in the region to promote infrastructure development and, more importantly, the development of private sector capabilities. Such investment (as in the case of trade) should not be limited to intra-African opportunities; there should also be an effort to bring in capitals and capabilities from the rest of the world.

The AfCFTA on its own is not sufficient to guarantee the transformation process; two complementary factors are also crucial. First, African countries need to improve physical and digital connections among themselves. Without soft and hard infrastructure connecting African countries physically (and virtually), the AfCFTA will not be enough to generate needed trade.

Second, it is unlikely that the AfCFTA at this stage will generate substantial and effective market liberalisation immediately, as much of this has already been achieved through the multiple RECs. It may bring down existing high tariffs between countries that, given distance and lack of connectivity, will not trade even under low tariffs.

Third, Africa needs a substantive boost of investment in its productive capacities that the AfCFTA per se is not expected to bring. African countries need to develop their productive capacities to meet demand from other African countries.

Meanwhile, industrial strategies need to be developed at the national, regional and continental levels. There is a major risk that the AfCFTA will eliminate intra-continental barriers while raising trade barriers with third countries. This strategy, followed by Latin America in the 1960s, has proven extremely costly and inefficient in generating the needed economic transformation. This may harm consumers’ welfare as well as affecting the productivity and competitiveness of African firms. Trade liberalisation is welcomed even at a regional level; however, it needs to be harnessed within a wider and deeper strategy of integration of Africa into the world economy.

In this sense, we should not overestimate the benefits of the AfCFTA and we should not underplay the challenges. The AfCFTA should be a first step in a wider integration and industrialisation strategy. Trade must be considered a tool rather than as an end in itself. The end is to increase trade (regardless of the partner) and to transform African economies to create jobs and raise living standards sustainably. The AfCFTA is not the single most important of the policies that African countries will need to deploy to transform their economies – but it is an extremely welcome one.

In addition, the agreement should aim to promote economic transformation as well as African trade. In this sense, the aim to increase intra-African trade may be misleading, as what African needs is more trade regardless of the partner. Aiming to increase intra-African trade may lead to distortions that will make many sectors inefficient and not competitive.

All this calls to raise awareness of the work that is needed to make a success of the AfCFTA and avoid certain undesirable outcomes. The agreement requires not only more elements of deep integration but also addressing of many of the multiple barriers that affect trade and economic transformation (beyond trade policies at the border). The AfCFTA must thus be welcomed and celebrated as long as the continent is ready to take the necessary steps to make of it a tool to put Africa into the world economy.

Maximiliano Mendez-Parra is a Senior Research Fellow at ODI.

Photo credit: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters 

Digitalisation and the Future of Manufacturing in Africa

Karishma Banga and Dirk Willem te Velde, March 2018

The growing digitalisation of economies and the associated rapid spread of advanced technologies like 3D printers, robots and cloud computing, is having a significant impact on manufacturing production globally. While the digital divide between developed and developing countries (particularly those in sub-Saharan Africa) is still significant, this does not mean developing countries will not be affected in the coming decades. With wages rising even in low-income countries, automation may become an increasingly attractive option to domestic firms, and furthermore, creeping automation of manufacturing in developed countries will have a knock-on effect globally.

Karishma Banga and Dirk Willem te Velde, March 2018

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The growing digitalisation of economies and the associated rapid spread of advanced technologies like 3D printers, robots and cloud computing, is having a significant impact on manufacturing production globally. While the digital divide between developed and developing countries (particularly those in sub-Saharan Africa) is still significant, this does not mean developing countries will not be affected in the coming decades. With wages rising even in low-income countries, automation may become an increasingly attractive option to domestic firms, and furthermore, creeping automation of manufacturing in developed countries will have a knock-on effect globally.

With investment and growth in manufacturing traditionally seen as one of the most promising pathways to industrialisation and economic transformation for developing economies, the question of how governments can prepare for this inevitable change is a crucial one for Africa’s long-term growth trajectory.

This paper presents new empirical analysis of the potential impact of growing digitalisation in manufacturing on Africa, and discusses what policymakers can do to exploit their current window of opportunity, address constraints in traditional manufacturing and prepare for the ‘digital wave’, which will bring with it a whole host of new opportunities and challenges.

Selected media and other coverage

‘US robots set to become cheaper than wages in Kenya’, East Africa Business Week, 16 March

‘Robots and automation: how Africa is at risk’, BBC Africa, 19 March

World Business Report, BBC World Service, 19 March (at 19.30)

Focus on Africa, BBC World Services, 19 March (at 4.18)

‘Selon l’Overseas Development Institute : Les robots seront moins chers que la main d’œuvre africaine à partir de 2034’, L’eral.net, 20 March (in French)

‘Will US robots take over African people’s jobs?‘ Software Testing News, 20 March

‘US robots ‘set to take’ African jobs’, Business Ghana, 20 March

‘US robots set to take African jobs’, Modern Ghana, 20 March

‘I robot e l’automazione dei processi, le nuove minacce per l’economia africana’, La Stampa Economia, 20 March (in Italian)

‘África se encuentra en riesgo en lo que respecta al servicio de automatización’, Blasting News, 20 March (in Spanish)

Infographics

Graphics: SET Programme. All rights reserved.

Photo: Factory workers producing shirts at Sleek Garment Export, in Accra, Ghana on October 13, 2015. © Dominic Chavez/World Bank.
License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

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