28 November 2018 | Digital Transformation in Kenyan Manufacturing and Job Creation

Wednesday 28 November 2018
Intercontinental Hotel, Nairobi

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While Kenya has emerged as leader of digitalisation in the African context, there is still a significant digital divide within Kenya in terms of access to and use of technology. Kenya therefore needs to engage with the digital economy actively by developing a well-informed digital industrial policy that aims at improving efficiencies of firms but also boosts employment opportunities and inclusive development. For this to occur, the digital industrial policy needs to be embedded within the wider industrial policy so that all segments of society can gain.

Amidst the many opportunities associated with the use of digital technologies in Kenya manufacturing, one concern expressed is the impact on labour. Since manufacturing forms part of Kenya’s Big Four agenda, the implications of growing digitalisation, both within Kenya and globally, brings into question the very role of manufacturing as a development pathway towards employment generation.

This event, hosted in partnership with the Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM), explores how digital technologies are affecting labour in Kenyan manufacturing and the discussion will identify policy priorities for digitally transforming Kenyan’s manufacturing sector and creating more productive jobs.

Photo: Real-time monitoring of the production line, through digitalisation, at New Wide Garments factory in Kenya’s Athi River EPZ, July 2018. Karishma Banga, all rights reserved.

4 October 2018 | Financing Tanzania’s Five-Year Development Plan 2016/17 – 2020/21

The Tanzanian government laid out ambitious industrialisation goals in its Five-Year Development Plan (FYDP II) 2016/17 – 2020/21, and the subsequent implementation plan. However, for those goals to be realised, progress must be made in a number of key development projects identified in the plan across the energy, transport, industry, agriculture, and minerals sectors. The challenge for the government lies in garnering sufficient finance from the private sector to move these projects forward.
This high-level workshop, hosted by the government of Tanzania and ODI, aims to address this challenge by bringing together government and potential investors and financiers to discuss constraints to financing for the key projects and to explore how, through public-private partnerships and other mechanisms, Tanzania’s industrialisation vision can be realised.

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The Tanzanian government laid out ambitious industrialisation goals in its Five-Year Development Plan (FYDP II) 2016/17 – 2020/21, and the subsequent implementation plan. However, for those goals to be realised, progress must be made in a number of key development projects identified in the plan across the energy, transport, industry, agriculture, and minerals sectors. The challenge for the government lies in garnering sufficient finance from the private sector to move these projects forward.

This technical working session, hosted by the government of Tanzania and ODI, aimed to address this challenge by bringing together government and potential investors and financiers to discuss constraints to financing for the key projects and to explore how, through public-private partnerships and other mechanisms, Tanzania’s industrialisation vision can be realised.

Photo: Tanzania’s new bus transit system, 2016. World Bank. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

5-6 June 2018 | Financing the development of special economic zones in Tanzania

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Tanzania has registered relatively little progress to date in establishing industrial parks and special economic zones (SEZs). None of the SEZ projects included in the country’s Second Five-Year Development Plan (FYDP II) have yet been realised. SEZs and industrial parks were not mentioned in the Minister of Finance and Planning’s latest speech to present the estimates of government revenue and expenditure for 2018/19, and the government appears to be prioritising spending on other infrastructure development over zones.

Instead, the private sector is increasingly expected to step in to develop new zones. Securing the necessary finance to develop these zones still appears to be challenging, although negotiations to attract investment into certain zones, such as the Bagamoyo Port project, are more advanced.

Against this backdrop, the SET  programme held a two-day workshop in Dar es Salaam on 5–6 June 2018 to discuss options for financing the development of SEZs and related infrastructure in Tanzania.

The workshop agenda and focus were designed in collaboration with Tanzania’s Export Processing Zones Authority (EPZA). It was attended by a range of different stakeholders, including representatives of Tanzanian development finance institutions, Tanzania’s Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment (through the ministry’s Textile Development Unit) and a range of external experts with knowledge of, or interest in, financing and other elements of developing industrial parks and SEZs in Tanzania and elsewhere in the East African region.

Photo: Dar es Salaam waterfront, 2017. David Stanley via Flickr. CC BY 2.0.

10 September 2018 | Kick-Starting Economic Transformation in Rwanda: Main Takeaways

Rwanda has committed itself to economic transformation as a pillar of its seven-year government programme, the National Strategy for Transformation (NST, 2017-24). The strategy has at its core the goal of generating 214,000 new jobs per year for the next seven years.
On 10 September 2018, the Rwandan Ministry of Trade and Industry (MINICOM) and the Supporting Economic Transformation (SET) team hosted a high-level roundtable: ‘Kick-starting Rwanda’s economic transformation: what needs to be done, when and by whom?’.

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Rwanda has committed itself to economic transformation as a pillar of its seven-year government programme, the National Strategy for Transformation (NST, 2017-24). The strategy has at its core the goal of generating 214,000 new jobs per year for the next seven years.

On 10 September 2018, the Rwandan Ministry of Trade and Industry (MINICOM) and the Supporting Economic Transformation (SET) team hosted a high-level roundtable: ‘Kick-starting Rwanda’s economic transformation: what needs to be done, when and by whom?’.

The objective of the roundtable was to stimulate discussion of the practical questions raised by the SET research programme, as set out in the briefing paper: Kick-starting economic transformation in Rwanda: four policy lessons and their implications.

Photo: Kigali factory, 2010. George Barya/Commonwealth Secretariat via Flickr. CC BY-NC 2.0.

17 July 2018 | Financing Garment Manufacturing in Kenya

On 17 July 2018, the SET programme at ODI, in partnership with the Kenyan Ministry of Industry, Trade and Cooperatives, convened a group of manufacturing firms, financers, Government representatives and others, to discuss Kenyan manufacturing within the industrialisation ‘pillar’ of President Kenyatta’s ‘Big Four’ agenda, and opportunities and challenges in the financing of textiles and garment manufacturing.

The workshop sought to bring firms and potential investors together to talk through constraints on both sides, and to begin to build relationships to support investments in the long term.

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On 17 July 2018, the SET programme at ODI, in partnership with the Kenyan Ministry of Industry, Trade and Cooperatives, convened a group of manufacturing firms, financers, Government representatives and others, to discuss Kenyan manufacturing within the industrialisation ‘pillar’ of President Kenyatta’s ‘Big Four’ agenda, and opportunities and challenges in the financing of textiles and garment manufacturing.

The workshop sought to bring firms and potential investors together to talk through constraints on both sides, and to begin to build relationships to support investments in the long term.

Photo: Dominic Chavez/World Bank.

8 August 2018 | Presentation | Skills Development Funds: Lessons from Asia

The SET programme is working with the Aung Myin Hmu (AMH) Garment Skills Training Centre, based in Yangon, Myanmar, to support its long-term sustainability, and to influence the development of the Myanmar Government’s skills development law, specifically a proposed skills development fund (SDF). Initial analysis of SDF models in other Asian countries was presented to stakeholders including senior figures at the Myanmar Ministry of Labour, Immigration and Population (MOLIP) at a meeting in Yangon in August 2018. Following the meeting, a multi-stakeholder SDF Technical Committee was set up by MOLIP, and Dr Krishnan addressed its first meeting on 11 August.

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The SET programme is working with the Aung Myin Hmu (AMH) Garment Skills Training Centre, based in Yangon, Myanmar, to support its long-term sustainability, and to influence the development of the Myanmar Government’s skills development law, specifically a proposed skills development fund (SDF).

Initial analysis of SDF models in other Asian countries was presented to stakeholders including senior figures at the Myanmar Ministry of Labour, Immigration and Population (MOLIP) at a meeting in Yangon in August 2018. Following the meeting, a multi-stakeholder SDF Technical Committee was set up by MOLIP, and Dr Krishnan addressed its first meeting on 11 August.

A final report, drawing out lessons specifically for policymakers in Myanmar, will be presented to government and other stakeholders in September 2018.

Photo: Shopkeeper working in a souvenir shop at the Bogyoke Market in Yangon. Asian Development Bank via Flickr. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. 

20 July 2018 | Kenya Trade Week & Exposition Breakfast: Launch of Kenya-UK Trade Study

On 20th July 2018, the Kenyan Export Promotion Council (EPC) hosted the breakfast launch of SET’s latest report, Kenya-UK trade and investment relations: taking stock and promoting exports to the UK.  The event also served as the opening of the EPC’s Trade Week, to celebrate 25 years of promoting Kenya’s exports.

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On 20th July, the Kenyan Export Promotion Council (EPC) hosted the breakfast launch of SET’s latest report, Kenya-UK trade and investment relations: taking stock and promoting exports to the UK.  The event also served as the opening of the EPC’s Trade Week, to celebrate 25 years of promoting Kenya’s exports.

Media coverage

‘Government urges exporters to rebrand products’, KBC Channel, 20 July

‘Kenya’s share of UK market shrinks by 13.2 per cent’, Mediamax Network, 20 July

‘Kenya’s UK export slack opens door to regional rivals’, Citizen Digital, 20 July

‘Rwanda, Ethiopia edge out Kenya in UK trade’, The Star (Kenya), 21 July

‘Kenya loses market share to Rwanda, Dar’, Rwanda Today, 23 July (also printed in Business Daily Africa)

‘Kenya losing her UK-market to neighbouring countries’, Soko Directory, 23 July

‘Kenya’s export value to UK declining’, Kenyan Citizen TV (via YouTube)

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‘Brexit offers Kenya an opportunity to negotiate beneficial trade deals’, Business Daily Africa (via YouTube)

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Photo credit: EPC. All rights reserved.

 

20 June 2018 | ACET African Transformation Forum: Manufacturing Chapter Session

 

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SET has been working closely with the African Center for Economic Tranformation (ACET) since the first African Transformation Forum (ATF) in 2016.

ACET, in collaboration with the Government of Ghana, will host the second ATF on June 20-21 2018. The ATF is a unique, policy-focused event that will bring together leading experts and practitioners to share perspectives on how to accelerate job growth, boost investment, and implement transformation policies.

As part of an ongoing collaboration as knowledge partners, SET will host the third session of the Manufacturing Chapter. The aim of the Chapter, which was  launched in June 2017, followed by a working session in December 2017, is to drive continuous conversation for African leaders to shape their countries’ industrialisation issues in the context of Africa’s transformation agenda.

The objective of this third session will be share experiences over the last year around the factors for success in African manufacturing. Country representatives from Ghana, Uganda, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Kenya, Nigeria and Rwanda, plus others will share their successes, their challnges and their plans for the future. Industry experts and senior officials from key government ministries, departments and agencies from selected African countries, development partners, civil society organizations, academia and the media will be invited to participate.

Agenda

10:15 – 10:30 Welcome

Hon. Robert Ahomka-Lindsay: Deputy Minister (Industry) Ministry of Trade and Industry, Ghana

10:30 – 10:45 Summary of PACT Chapter Progress

Buddy Buruku, ACET

This session will provide the summary of activities of the light manufacturing chapter of PACT since its inception.

10:45 – 13:00 Moderated Q&A

Moderator: Dr. Dirk Willem te Velde, Overseas Development Institute (ODI)

This session will focus on knowledge sharing around the core areas deemed pivotal to unlocking light manufacturing in Africa. Discussion will focus on how to get the basics of industrialization right and how to mount an effective export push, among other topics. This session will provide an opportunity to hear from country representatives on how they are addressing various issues, specifically highlighting what has and hasn’t worked well. The session will include Q&A with participants.

13:00 – 14:00   Lunch

14:00 – 15:00  Panel On Key Issues in Manufacturing

Moderator: Tony Oteng Gyasi – Managing Director, Tropical Cables and Conductors

Panelists:

  • Hanna Zemichael, Chief of Staff, Ethiopia Investment Commission
  • Alphonse Kwizera, Director, Rwanda Association of Manufacturers
  • Gituro Wainana, Former Head of Kenya’s Vision 2030

This session will feature stakeholders from various sectors who will respond to the issues raised in the morning discussion based on their own perspectives.  The objective is to bring in the view point of private sector, development partners, and CSO/think tank, etc. on the central challenges and opportunities highlighted by policy makers from various countries. The session will include Q&A with participants.

15:00 – 15:45  Presentation and discussion on Future of Industrialization and Job Creation

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Presenter: Karishma Banga – Senior Research Officer, Overseas Development Institute (ODI)

This session will explore key new issues related to job creation and the future of industrialization. African countries need to create 15 million additional jobs each year until 2030 (or 40,000 each day) in order to keep up with demographic challenges, yet the manufacturing sector has so far not met these needs. It is critical that countries consider the changing nature of work and where job creation opportunities are most likely to present themselves given the global shift toward digitization and automation (i.e. the 4th Industrial revolution). Policy makers, private sector, development partners and research institutions, etc. will discuss their role in transforming the manufacturing space. The session will include Q&A with participants.

15:45- 16:00  Coffee break

16:00 – 17:15   PACT Consensus and way forward

Dr. Dirk Willem te Velde

Nigel Gwynne-Evans, Chief Director African Industrial Development, The Department of Trade and Industry South Africa

This session will synthesize the key issues discussed throughout the day, including distilling the key issues to be addressed in the sector for there to be measurable progress in the short- to medium-term. The objective is for the participants to come to a broad consensus on what the PACT chapter will focus on going forward and which activities it will aim to prioritize. These will be reported back to all ATF2018 participants at the plenary on Day 2.

Background materials

This session will be held at 10 am GMT on 20 June 2018. You can download reports of session one and two here:

DOWNLOAD: Manufacturing Chapter Launch – 5 June 2017

DOWNLOAD: Manufacturing Chapter Working Session One – 11 Dec 2017

DOWNLOAD: Manufacturing Chapter Working Session Two – 20 June 2018

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23 March 2018 | Digitalisation and the future of manufacturing in Africa

The growing digitalisation of economies and the associated rapid spread of advanced technologies like 3D printers, robots and cloud computing has a significant impact on manufacturing production globally. While the digital divide between developed and developing countries (particularly those in sub-Saharan Africa) is still significant, implying that low-income countries benefit less from digitalisation, there are important international pathways that affect the future of manufacturing-led development in Africa. Given this, the panel will discuss the major opportunities and threats that the fast-expanding digital economy poses for low and middle-income countries, which have traditionally used manufacturing as a first step towards economic transformation.

Session at the Global Development Network (GDN)’s 18th Global Development Conference: Science, Technology & Innovation for Development (#STI4D)

14.00-15.30 (GMT+5.30), Institute for Studies in Industrial Development, New Delhi (Auditorium, Ground Floor, Block B)

Watch the event below (from 5:27):

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The growing digitalisation of economies and the associated rapid spread of advanced technologies like 3D printers, robots and cloud computing has a significant impact on manufacturing production globally. While the digital divide between developed and developing countries (particularly those in sub-Saharan Africa) is still significant, implying that low-income countries benefit less from digitalisation, there are important international pathways that affect the future of manufacturing-led development in Africa. Given this, the panel will discuss the major opportunities and threats that the fast-expanding digital economy poses for low and middle-income countries, which have traditionally used manufacturing as a first step towards economic transformation.

ODI will present new empirical evidence of the impact of digitalisation on labour productivity in low-income and sub-Saharan African countries and discuss the policy implications. An expert panel will then discuss factors driving development in the digital economy, experiences from Kenya on how to become digitally-ready, and what policy makers can do to prepare for the ‘digital wave’ whist also exploiting the current window of opportunity to address constraints and upgrade traditional manufacturing.

With investment and growth in manufacturing traditionally seen as one of the most promising pathways to job creation and economic transformation for developing economies, the question of how governments can prepare for inevitable changes is a crucial one for Africa’s long-term growth trajectory.

Chair

Dirk Willem te Velde  – Principal Research Fellow and Head, International Economic Development Group, ODI @DWteVelde

Speakers

Karishma Banga – Senior Research Officer, ODI @karishma_banga

Anupam Khanna – Former Chief Economist & Director-General for Policy Outreach, NASSCOM

Edward Brown – Director of Country Engagement and Operations, African Center for Economic Transformation (ACET) @AcetforAfrica

Aruna Bolaky – Economic Affairs, Division for Africa, Least Developed Countries and Special Programmes (ALDC), United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) @arunabolaky

 

For further information on the conference, including a full agenda and how to register to attend, visit the GDN website.

22 February 2018 | How ‘smart’ trade policy can help Africa industrialise

Despite promising signs of economic growth, many African countries are struggling to develop the strong industrial sector required for economic transformation and job creation. Fresh thinking is needed on how to achieve Africa’s industrialisation objectives, with trade and trade policy increasingly being looked to as key tools for the task. Much recent research has explored this idea by analysing the extent to which current trade policies and tariff structures are positively contributing to the content’s industrialisation policy, and providing assessments of what African economies can do to industrialise ‘smartly’ through trade. This event sees an expert panel debate these issues and seeks to put forward concrete policy recommendations for African economies looking to realise their industrialisation ambitions.

Thursday 22 February, 16.30-18.00
Overseas Development Institute
203 Blackfriars Road, London SE1 8NJ

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Despite promising signs of economic growth, many African countries are struggling to develop the strong industrial sector required for economic transformation and job creation. Fresh thinking is needed on how to achieve Africa’s industrialisation objectives, with trade and trade policy increasingly being looked to as key tools for the task.

Much recent research has explored this idea by analysing the extent to which current trade policies and tariff structures are positively contributing to the content’s industrialisation policy, and providing assessments of what African economies can do to industrialise ‘smartly’ through trade.

This event sees an expert panel debate these issues and seeks to put forward concrete policy recommendations for African economies looking to realise their industrialisation ambitions.

Chair

Dirk Willem te Velde @DWteVelde – Principle Research Fellow, Overseas Development Institute (ODI)

Panel

David Luke – Coordinator, African Trade Policy Centre at the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA)

Linda Calabrese @lindacalab – Research Fellow, Overseas Development Institute (ODI)

Abbi M. Kedir – Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor in International Business, Sheffield University

Chi Atanga @ck_atanga – Founder, Walls of Benin

Photo credit: Jonathan Ernst/World Bank. Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

4 December 2017 | Launch event: Adjusting to rising costs in Chinese light manufacturing

On 4 December 2017, the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) and the Center for New Structural Economics (CNSE) at Peking University, Beijing, hosted the launch of the ODI–CNSE joint report, Adjusting to rising costs in Chinese light manufacturing: what opportunities for developing countries?
The report presents the findings of a survey of 640 light manufacturing firms in China’s Pearl River and Yangtze River Deltas, in an effort to understand the pressures facing Chinese light manufacturing firms and such firms’ responses to these challenges, and especially their interest in investing ‘out’ into countries in Africa and the rest of Asia.
Regional launch events were held in Ningbo in the Yangtze River Delta region and in Guangzhou in the Pearl River Delta on 11 and 12 December 2017.

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On 4 December 2017, the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) and the Center for New Structural Economics (CNSE) at Peking University, Beijing, hosted the launch of the ODI–CNSE joint report, Adjusting to rising costs in Chinese light manufacturing: what opportunities for developing countries?

The report presents the findings of a survey of 640 light manufacturing firms in China’s Pearl River and Yangtze River Deltas, in an effort to understand the pressures facing Chinese light manufacturing firms and such firms’ responses to these challenges, and especially their interest in investing ‘out’ into countries in Africa and the rest of Asia.

Regional launch events were held in Ningbo in the Yangtze River Delta region and in Guangzhou in the Pearl River Delta on 11 and 12 December 2017.

Media coverage

‘Chinese manufacturing may not be moving to Africa all that soon’, Quartz Africa, 5 December

‘China Light Industry Survey Report: Labor costs have become the number one challenge’, Shanghai Securities News, 5 December (in Mandarin)

‘China Light Industry Enterprises “Going Global” Survey: Nearly 30% of shoe companies have plans or have invested abroad’, 21st Century Business Herald, 6 December (in Mandarin)

‘China must focus on innovation in manufacturing as wages rise, says Apple’s Cook’, South China Morning Post, 6 December

‘Costs push shoemakers to set foot abroad’, Global Times, 7 December

‘Labor costs rose, 27% of China’s footwear companies surveyed to be “going out”‘, Yangcheng Evening News, 12 December

‘”Promote economic restructuring – China’s manufacturing enterprises to upgrade and go global research report” successfully released in Guangzhou’, Southern Network, 13 December

‘China’s manufacturing enterprises to upgrade and go out, research report released’, Guangming, 13 December

 

Photo credit: CNSE. All rights reserved.

 

13 December 2017 | Trade, Trade Policy and Economic Transformation at the WTO MC11

Side Event at the WTO Ministerial Trade & Sustainable Development Symposium, Bolsa de Cereales, Buenos Aires, Argentina 

ODI side event hosted by Supporting Economic Transformation:
Breakout Room 3,  on Wednesday 13 December 2017 at 13:30-15:00

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Economic transformation is crucial for the type of growth that reduces poverty, create jobs and is resilient to shocks. But many low-income countries have failed to transform successfully. Trade has nearly always been a key component in those countries that have transformed successfully. This event will unpack the role that trade has played in the process of transformation in a number of countries and regions and discuss how trade policy provisions such as those currently under discussion at the WTO can further contribute.

The Supporting Economic Transformation (SET) at ODI defines economic transformation as the process of moving from low productivity to high productivity activities, either between or within sectors. Trade, or exposure to trade, can increase productivity in existing sectors or firms as well as move resources from inefficient into efficient firms and sectors.

Multilateral trade provisions can help set the right incentives to invest, innovate, produce and trade in sectors with comparative advantage. They can also generate maintain opportunities in new sectors currently affected by global protectionism and other trade distortions. Current discussions at the WTO that might affect ET includes the elimination of subsidies in fishing, tightening disciplines on domestic support of agriculture and further provisions on digital trade and e-commerce.

This event is part of the Trade & Sustainable Development Symposium (TSDS), which is running alongside the WTO MC11 conference in Buenos Aires.

A link to the event page for TSDS can be found online here.

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Chair

Dirk Willem te Velde  – Principal Research Fellow and Head, International Economic Development Group, ODI @DWteVelde

Speakers

Dr. Lucio Castro – Secretary for Productive Transformation, Ministry of Production of Argentina @LucioCastro_

Patricia Francis – Former Executive Director of ITC, and former member UN Secretary-General’s High-Level Panel on Women’s Economic Empowerment @patrfrancis

Anabel Gonzalez – Senior Director, The World Bank Group @Gonzalez_WBG

Andrew McCoubrey – Deputy Director for Trade for Development, Department for International Trade, UK

Dr Maximiliano Mendez-Parra – Senior Research Fellow, Overseas Development Institute @m_mendezparra

26 October 2017 | Pathways to Prosperity and Inclusive Job Creation in Nepal

On 26th October 2017, the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) in collaboration with South Asia Watch on Trade, Economics and Environment (SAWTEE) presented new research on job creation and pathways to prosperity in Nepal. This research was launched at a high-profile event in Kathmandu, attended by stakeholders from the four sectors studied, development partners and various private sector associations including the Federation of Nepalese Chambers of Commerce and Industry, the ILO and the Confederation of Nepalese Industries. The Honourable Vice Chairman of the Nepal National Planning Commission, Swarnim Wagle also attended.

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On 26th October 2017, the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) in collaboration with South Asia Watch on Trade, Economics and Environment (SAWTEE) presented new research on job creation and pathways to prosperity in Nepal.

Building a consensus view of how Nepal can transform and create jobs in the future is crucial to incentivise policy action. However, there seems to be little or no political debate on job creation. This presented an opportunity to agree a consensus view and unifying, practical vision on how the country can transform and create jobs. A new extensive study carried out in January 2017 examined what can be done to ease Nepal’s constraints to job creation, based on a new firm-level survey in four promising sectors: agro-processing; light manufacturing; information and communication technology (ICT); and tourism. The study examined major constraints to the firm-level growth and the Nepalese labour market in terms of labour market tightness and labour market skills and proposes general recommendations as well as sector-specific policy suggestions.

This research was launched at a high-profile event in Kathmandu, attended by stakeholders from the four sectors studied, development partners and various private sector associations including the Federation of Nepalese Chambers of Commerce and Industry, the ILO and the Confederation of Nepalese Industries. The Honourable Vice Chairman of the Nepal National Planning Commission, Swarnim Wagle also attended.

Media coverage

Leading English dailies (also in print)

Full editorial: Labour issues, Kathmandu Post, 31 October

Nepal to face labour shortage by 2030, Kathmandu Post, 27 October

Stakeholders stress on inclusive job creation, Himalayan Times, 27 October

Nepal to face labour shortage by 2030, Wio News, 27 October

Weight of migration (Editorial), Kathmandu Post, 2 February 2018

National news coverage (from 4:40) Karobar news

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 National news coverage (from 22:00): Artha ko Artha

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30 October 2017 | The future of manufacturing-led development

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With increasing use of advanced digital technologies in manufacturing, such as 3D printing, robots and cloud computing, the landscape of technology and globalisation patterns is altering. As manufacturing becomes more automated, the criteria of being an attractive production location changes from offering inexpensive labour to lower capital costs and more advanced technology. This suggests that the economic progress in developing countries, who often rely on their comparative advantage in labour-intensive manufacturing, may be at risk.

To discuss how developing countries can adapt to the changing nature of globalisation, this World Bank, DFID, ODI/SET event will hear from Anabel González, Senior Director and Mary Hallward-Driemeier, Senior Economic Advisor in the Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice at the World Bank. The World Bank’s recent report, ‘Trouble in the Making? The Future of Manufacturing-Led Development’ suggests that while emerging technologies may threaten manufacturing as a pathway for low-income countries to develop, it can also present new opportunities given appropriate policy actions. The report explores policy agenda based on three dimensions; competitiveness, capabilities and connectedness.

For further information or to express your interest in attending this event, please contact Karishma Banga at ODI (k.banga@odi.org.uk).

 

Speakers

His Excellency Dr Hailemichael Aberra Afework – Ethiopian Ambassador to the UK

Dirk Willem te Velde – Principal Research Fellow, ODI and Director, SET

Anabel González – Senior Director, Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice at World Bank

Mary Hallward-Driemeier – Senior Economic Advisor, Trade and Competitiveness at World Bank

Nick Lea – Deputy Chief Economist, DFID

Karishma Banga – Researcher, ODI

Simon Maxwell – Senior Associate and former Director, ODI

Jonathan Rosenthal – Africa editor, The Economist

 

Photo credit: © Dominic Chavez/World Bank. License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

14 September 2017 | A UK-Liberia partnership: investing in infrastructure, energy and agriculture

On 14th September 2017, the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), in partnership with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and the Liberia National Investment Commission (LNIC), hosted a workshop and networking event in London. The event’s aims were two-fold: firstly, to explore the state of Liberia’s economy and the potential opportunities and challenges for foreign investors, and secondly, to facilitate relationship-building between Liberia and UK-based international investors seeking to opportunities to support development in the sub-Saharan African country.

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On 14th September 2017, the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), in partnership with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and the Liberia National Investment Commission (LNIC), hosted a workshop and networking event in London. The event’s aims were two-fold: firstly, to explore the state of Liberia’s economy and the potential opportunities and challenges for foreign investors, and secondly, to facilitate relationship-building between Liberia and UK-based international investors seeking to opportunities to support development in the sub-Saharan African country.

The ODI was honoured to welcome to the event several members of the Liberian Government,  as well as His Excellency Dr Mohammed Sheriff, the Liberian Ambassador to the UK, and David Belgrove OBE, British Ambassador to Liberia, representatives from CDC and over 30 private investors based in the UK.

Presentations from LNIC and Liberian Government representatives outlined Liberia’s past and current challenges, promising recent economic growth, and the wealth of promising financing opportunities for investors across agriculture and agri-business, infrastructure, water, energy, manufacturing and tourism.

Information on investment opportunities can be found within the event report, available for download above. For further detail, please contact Quinton Tunis at the LNIC (tunisq@gmail.com).

Photo credit: Albert K. Jaja.

5 September 2017 | Justin Yifu Lin: How to jump-start developing economies

For decades, low-income countries have been trying to catch up with the economic progress made by industrialised, high-income nations, but few have succeeded. So how can low-income countries jump-start their economies and achieve the structural transformation that can create jobs and improve livelihoods? To discuss this issue, this event hears from leading development economist, former chief economist for the World Bank and advisor to Chinese and African governments, Professor Justin Lin. Exploring themes from two of his recently published books, ‘Beating the Odds: Jump-Starting Developing Economies’ and ‘Going Beyond Aid: Development Cooperation for Structural Transformation’.

 

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For decades, low-income countries have been trying to catch up with the economic progress made by industrialised, high-income nations, but few have succeeded. So how can low-income countries jump-start their economies and achieve the structural transformation that can create jobs and improve livelihoods?

To discuss this issue, this event heard from leading development economist, former chief economist for the World Bank and advisor to Chinese and African governments, Professor Justin Lin. Exploring themes from two of his recently published books, ‘Beating the Odds: Jump-Starting Developing Economies’ and ‘Going Beyond Aid: Development Cooperation for Structural Transformation’, Lin seeks to dispel a range of ideas that are commonly thought to be helping or impeding developing economies. ‘Beating the Odds’ explains what is wrong with mainstream development thinking and offers a practical blueprint for moving poor countries out of the low-income trap regardless of their circumstances. ‘Going Beyond Aid’, furthermore, argues that traditional development aid is inadequate to address the bottlenecks for the structural transformation these countries badly need.

Drawing on the successful experiences of countries such as China and South Korea and the new ideas from emerging market economies such as Brazil and India, this event presents a new narrative to broaden the debate around economic development, and the ways in which traditional aid delivery helps or hinders it.

Chair

Dirk Willem te Velde @DWteVelde  – Principal Research Fellow and Head, International Economic Development Group,ODI

Speakers

Justin Lin – former World Bank Chief Economist

Melinda Bohannon @MelindaBohannon – Deputy Director for Growth & Resilience, UK Department for International Development (DFID)

 

Photo credit: World Bank via Flickr

5 July 2017 | 10 policy priorities for Kenyan manufacturing launch

Hosted in partnership with the Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM), this launch event saw the introduction to Kenyan policymakers and political leaders of SET and KAM’s recent publication, Ten policy priorities for transforming manufacturing and creating jobs in Kenya. This event featured contributions from Dr Neil Balchin, ODI Research Fellow, KAM’s CEO Phyllis Wakiaga, Vice Chair Sachen Gudka and Chairperson Florence Mutahi, as well as leading economist Anzetse Were. The occasion also saw commitments made by political parties and coalitions to prioritise Kenya’s industrialisation, and the development of the manufacturing sector in particular.

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Hosted in partnership with the Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM), this launch event saw the introduction to Kenyan policymakers and political leaders of SET and KAM’s recent publication, Ten policy priorities for transforming manufacturing and creating jobs in Kenya. 

The 10-point policy plan was developed in collaboration with various private and public sector stakeholders, and both examines the current state of Kenyan manufacturing and offers clear, tailored policy solutions to a range of problems, from land ownership to sustainable, clean energy.

This event featured contributions from Dr Neil Balchin, ODI Research Fellow, KAM’s CEO Phyllis Wakiaga, Vice Chair Sachen Gudka and Chairperson Florence Mutahi, as well as leading economist Anzetse Were. The occasion  also saw commitments made by political parties and coalitions to prioritise Kenya’s industrialisation, and the development of the manufacturing sector in particular, whatever the outcome of August’s presidential election.

Media coverage

Business Daily, 5 July

XinhuaNet, 5 July

The Standard, 6 July

Mediamax, 6 July

The Star, 6 July

Coastweek.com, 7 July

KBC Channel 1, 7 July

Liex Consult, 10 July (blog)

Business Daily, 16 July

The East African, 25 July

 

5 June 2017 | ACET PACT Manufacturing Chapter Launch

Manufacturing is also a key element in the African Development Bank’s Hi-Fives (Industrialize Africa) and a priority area in Goal number two of the African Union’s Vision 2063. ACET in partnership with the Oversees Development Institute (ODI) and the Government of Ethiopia organised the manufacturing chapter meeting of PACT. The aim of the manufacturing meeting was to kick start a continuous conversation for African leaders to shape their countries’ industrialisation issues in the context of Africa’s transformation agenda.

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Africa’s experience with manufacturing has been mixed. Despite bursts of growth in the 1960s and mid-1980s, Africa currently has less formal manufacturing than any region of the world (lower than 10% share of gross domestic product, GDP, in most countries). In the early days of independence, governments across the continent sought to promote manufacturing with large state-owned enterprises, however macroeconomic instability, competition from exports and rising production costs, led to a decline in the manufacturing share of GDP in many countries.

Manufacturing is among eight core issues identified as vital to Africa’s economic transformation during the African Transformation Forum jointly convened by the Government of Rwanda and the African Center for Economic Transformation (ACET) in March 2016 in Kigali. The main outcome of the forum was the launch of the Pan-African Coalition for Transformation (PACT), a network designed to bring together key stakeholders around shared themes to speed up economic transformation in Africa. PACT identified eight core pathways and drivers to economic transformation.

Manufacturing is also a key element in the African Development Bank’s Hi-Fives (Industrialize Africa) and a priority area in Goal number two of the African Union’s Vision 2063. Africa currently has less formal manufacturing than any region of the world and in order for it to break into the global market; there are a number of interdependent challenges to overcome.

ACET in partnership with the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) and the Government of Ethiopia organised the manufacturing chapter meeting of PACT. The aim of the manufacturing meeting was to kick start a continuous conversation for African leaders to shape their countries’ industrialisation issues in the context of Africa’s transformation agenda. The main objectives of the meeting was to:

  • Develop a shared understanding of the manufacturing landscape in Africa, key challenges and opportunities;
  • Explore practical solutions to key issues by learning from country experiences in six countries Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Mozambique and Ghana;
  • Introduce the vision and objectives for the PACT Manufacturing Chapter, understand country priorities and discuss next steps for chapter membership and engagement.

The meeting brought together about 40 industry experts and senior officials from key government ministries, departments and agencies from selected African countries, development partners, civil society organizations, academia and the media.

Follow #PACT2017 #Manufacturing2017 to join the debate and email Freda Yawson (fyawson@acetforafrica.org) for more information on ACET.

Media coverage

Online

Anzetse Were, Business Daily Africa, 11 June 2017

The Reporter Ethiopia, 10 June 2017

All Africa, 15 June 2017

 

 

 

14 March 2017 | Foreign direct investment and economic transformation in Myanmar: the role of the garment sector

On 14 March, SET hosted a workshop in Yangon to present and discuss the findings of the recent research paper, ‘Foreign direct investment and economic transformation in Myanmar’. Attendees explored questions around the role of the garment sector, including: what role does the garment sector play in promoting exports, employment and the transfer of skills in Myanmar? How does foreign investment contribute to Myanmar’s garment sector? And how can foreign investment, from China and other countries, further contribute to economic transformation in Myanmar?

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On 14 March, SET hosted a workshop in Yangon to present and discuss the findings of the recent research paper, ‘Foreign direct investment and economic transformation in Myanmar’. Attendees explored questions around the role of the garment sector, including: what role does the garment sector play in promoting exports, employment and the transfer of skills in Myanmar? How does foreign investment contribute to Myanmar’s garment sector? And how can foreign investment, from China and other countries, further contribute to economic transformation in Myanmar?

The meeting was attended by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), Pyoe Pin, SMART Myanmar, the Business Innovation Facility, the DaNa facility, Envisage and a leading European retailer.

Photo credit: ILO/NgSwanTi

23 February 2017 | The UK’s financial sector and sub-Saharan Africa: partnerships for development

On 23 February, SET, in partnership with the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Trade and Investment, hosted a private roundtable event in the Palace of Westminster, London. The event brought together representatives of developing countries with donors, private investors and representatives of the City of London to identify opportunities for private sector investment in sub-Saharan Africa. Amongst topics of discussion were the practical and financial challenges facing British investors seeking to finance development, including in sectors such as infrastructure, energy and manufacturing, ways to overcome barriers to the achievement of high-quality, sustainable economic transformation, and the growing role of development finance institutions.

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On 23 February, SET, in partnership with the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Trade and Investment (APPGTI), hosted a private roundtable event in the Palace of Westminster, London.  The event, chaired by Geoffrey Clifton-Brown MP, APPGTI Chair, brought together representatives of developing countries with donors, private investors and representatives of the City of London to identify opportunities for private sector investment in sub-Saharan Africa. Representatives of firms including Prudential and Gold and General, donors CDC and the Department for International Development (DFID) and TheCityUK were in attendance.

Amongst topics of discussion were the practical and financial challenges facing British investors seeking to finance development, including in sectors such as infrastructure, energy and manufacturing, ways to overcome barriers to the achievement of high-quality, sustainable economic transformation, and the growing role of development finance institutions.

As DFID seeks to promote the City of London as a global leader in private finance for development, SET will continue to engage with this promising policy approach to driving development in the world’s poorest countries.

For more information on this work, contact Judith Tyson (j.tyson@odi.org.uk).

22 March 2017 | Economic transformation: a new approach to inclusive growth

Economic transformation has the potential to reduce poverty and drive sustainable, inclusive growth in developing countries. Yet, efforts to promote transformational policies have not always proven to be successful; many low-income countries that have attempted to transform their economies have experienced low-quality, job-less growth with little in the way of genuine transformation. This ODI panel event sees the launch of SET’s flagship approach paper, and bring together key figures driving forward the transformation agenda to discuss: what is economic transformation, what does it mean for the world’s poorest, and how can it be supported in practice?

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January 2017 saw the launch of the UK Department for International Development’s first economic development strategy, demonstrating how the potential of economic transformation to create jobs and reduce poverty is becoming central to the objectives of many developing countries and aid agencies.

There is no doubt that economic transformation – the movement of labour from low- to higher-productivity sectors (for example, agriculture to manufacturing) – has the potential to reduce poverty and drive sustainable, inclusive growth in developing countries. Yet, efforts to promote transformational policies have not always proven to be successful; many low-income countries that have attempted to transform their economies have experienced low-quality, job-less growth with little in the way of genuine transformation.

This ODI panel event saw the launch of SET’s flagship approach paper, and brought together key figures driving forward the transformation agenda to discuss: what is economic transformation, what does it mean for the world’s poorest, and how can it be supported in practice?

Speakers

Chair

Dirk Willem te Velde @DWteVelde – Principle Research Fellow and Director of the SET programme, ODI

Speakers

Margaret McMillan – Associate Professor of Economics, Tufts University and Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research

David Booth @DavidBoothODI – Senior Research Fellow, ODI

Discussants

Louise Fox – Chief Economist, USAID

Edward Brown – Director of Policy Advisory Service, African Center for Economic Transformation (via video link)

Melinda Bohannon – Deputy Director, Growth & Resilience Department, Department for International Development

Debapriya Bhattacharya – Distinguished Fellow, Centre for Policy Dialogue (via video link)

Agenda

12.00-12.30: Sandwich lunch served

12.30-12.35: Introduction from the Chair

12.35-13.10: Speakers presentations and questions from the Chair

13.10-14.00: Q&A with the audience

 

Photo credit: Andrea Moroni

11 November 2016 | Trade in Services and Economic Transformation Roundtable

In collaboration with DFID, the ODI-SET team organised a Trade in Services Roundtable Event hosted at DFID London on 11 November 2016. The roundtable sought to unpack the key challenges and opportunities for trade in services in developing countries and identify what DFID can do over the next five years to support services. The event report summarises key thematic issues emerging based on roundtable reflections from representatives from ODI, TheCityUK, Commonwealth Secretariat, European University Institute, ILEAP, International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development, International Growth Centre, International Trade Centre, Sussex University, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, Centre for Global Development, and World Bank.

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Roundtable: 11 November 2016, 10.00–15.00 Department for International Development, Whitehall, London

In collaboration with DFID, the ODI-SET team organised a Trade in Services Roundtable Event hosted at DFID London on 11 November 2016. The roundtable sought to unpack the key challenges and opportunities for trade in services in developing countries and identify what DFID can do over the next five years to support services. The event report summarises key thematic issues emerging based on roundtable reflections from representatives from ODI, TheCityUK, Commonwealth Secretariat, European University Institute, ILEAP, International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development, International Growth Centre, International Trade Centre, Sussex University, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, Centre for Global Development, and World Bank, and introduced by the UK Department for International Development.

This event discussed findings from a SET report on Trade and Services in Economic Transformation. A report summary can be downloaded below.

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Agenda and participants

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Presentations

SET/ODI Presentation

European University Institute Presentation

 

This event follows an earlier trade session at WTO Trade and Development Symposium (2015)

Photo credit: Kate Bacungco/World Bank

27 October 2016 | Effective Implementation and the Role of the Private Sector in Tanzania’s Five Year Development Plan

The SET programme, in collaboration with the Economic and Social Research Foundation (ESRF), organised a private sector consultative workshop on 27 October 2016 in Dar es Salaam. The workshop sought to build consensus around how to approach implementation of the FYDP II and on the core elements that should constitute a strategy and framework to guide the effective implementation of the Plan. In addition, the workshop was designed to develop a shared understanding of the practical roles that different stakeholders – both in the public and private sectors – should play in implementing the FYDP II.

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Event photographs available on SET Flickr

In June 2016, the Government of Tanzania (GoT) launched the country’s Second Five-Year Development Plan (FYDP II) 2016/17-2020/21 under the overarching theme of ‘Nurturing Industrialisation for Economic Transformation and Human Development’.

The GoT is currently developing an implementation strategy to guide the implementation of FYDP II. In order to be successful, the practical implementation of the Plan will need to be guided by an agreed set of implementation principles and be supported through effective involvement of the private sector. To support this process, and ensure private sector engagement and input into the strategic implementation of the FYDP II from the outset, the SET programme, in collaboration with the Economic and Social Research Foundation (ESRF) organised a private sector consultative workshop on 27 October 2016 in Dar es Salaam. The workshop sought to build consensus around how to approach implementation of the FYDP II and on the core elements that should constitute a strategy and framework to guide the effective implementation of the Plan. In addition, the workshop was designed to develop a shared understanding of the practical roles that different stakeholders – both in the public and private sectors – should play in implementing the FYDP II.

The Tanzanian Ministry of Finance and Planning and the Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment attended as well as the Honourable Regional Commissioner of Simiyu, Mr. Antony Mtaka

The workshop was attended by a range of different private sector actors including representatives of umbrella organisations, industry associations, agencies and private companies. Some of these include:

  • Tanzania Private Sector Foundation (TPSF)
  • Tanzania Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture (TCCIA)
  • Leather Association of Tanzania
  • Moshi Leather Industries
  • Heko Pharmacy and Keko Pharmaceuticals Industries
  • Tanzania Revenue Authority (TRA), Tanzania Port Authority (TPA), Tanzania Bureau of Standards (TBS), Tanzania National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), Tanzania Industrial Research and Development Organisation (TIRD)

Other actors were also present at the workshop, including representatives from a number of Tanzania’s development partners (including DFID, the Delegation of the European Union (EU) to Tanzania, the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), the United States, Japanese and Swiss embassies, USAID and the World Bank), development banks (National Development Corporation, Tanzania Agricultural Development Bank, TIB Development Bank) and a range of research institutions and think tanks, non-governmental organisations, civil society organisations and academia.

Presentations

Ministry of Finance and Planning Presentation

Tanzania Private Sector Foundation Presentation

Tanzania Chamber of Commerce, Industry, and Agriculture Presentation

SET-ODI Presentation

 

This event is part of ongoing SET support to the second Tanzanian Five-Year Development Plan.

A workshop was previously organised to support the drafting of the plan in October 2015.

 

29 August 2016 | Supporting Manufacturing in Kenya

The key questions explored at this roundtable were around Kenyan manufacturing: Why is productivity low in manufacturing? Why is informality not decreasing with economic growth? Why is there a lack of linkages between services on the one hand, and manufacturing and agriculture on the other hand? And what can be done about these challenges? The SET team is currently scoping out support for Kenya’s transformation with analytical and other inputs. The roundtable aimed to discuss and develop this collaboratively.

Roundtable: 29 August 2016, 10:00-13:00, Sarova Panafric Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya

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Manufacturing in Kenya – Anzetse Were

The Role of Finance in Kenyan Manufacturing – Phyllis Papadavid

Transforming Kenyan Industry – John Page
Kenya aims to develop manufacturing through the Kenya Industrial Transformation Programme and the 2030 Manufacturing Agenda. However, so far, productivity growth in Kenya has been slow in a comparative context, the share of manufacturing in GDP in Kenya remains low and there are concerns about the low level of formal manufacturing jobs created.

The key questions explored at this roundtable were around Kenyan manufacturing: Why is productivity low in manufacturing? Why is informality not decreasing with economic growth? Why is there a lack of linkages between services on the one hand, and manufacturing and agriculture on the other hand? And what can be done about these challenges? The SET team is currently scoping out support for Kenya’s transformation with analytical and other inputs. The roundtable aimed to discuss and develop this collaboratively. Three scoping inputs were prepared by Anzetse Were, John Page and Dirk Willem te Velde, available for download below.

Chair

Dirk Willem te Velde – Senior Research Fellow, ODI and Director, SET

Presenters

John Page – Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution

Anzetse Were – Economist and independent consultant

Views were also expressed by Government of Kenya representatives, Kenyan Association of Manufacturers (KAM) and DFID Kenya.

Presentations

Dirk Willem te Velde slides

John Page slides

TICAD VI 2016 | Africa’s Industrialisation and Economic Transformation

The SET programme will be participating at TICAD side events in partnership with (JICA and IDE-JETRO. Industrial development and economic transformation are crucial for Africa’s development, but there is a heated debate on how to achieve them. Three events will explore the respective roles of government and private sector in policy development and implementation for Africa’s industrialisation.

The Sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD VI) Summit was held at Kenyatta International Convention Center in Nairobi, Kenya on 27th -28th August 2016. This was the first time TICAD is being held in Africa since its inception in 1993.

The SET programme participated at TICAD side events in partnership with Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Institute of Developing Economies (IDE-JETRO). Industrial development and economic transformation are crucial for Africa’s development, but there is a heated debate on how to achieve them. Three events explored the respective roles of government and private sector in policy development and implementation for Africa’s industrialisation.

26 Aug 2016: Africa’s Transformation through Industrial development and implementing the Agenda 2063

13:00-15:00, Hilton Hotel, Nairobi Kenya

How can market mechanisms respond to the development challenges which Africa faces, and what are the roles of the government?  How should industrial policy be formulated and implemented? This seminar will discuss some of these key questions with scholars and practitioners.

Opening Remarks: Dr. Shinichi Kitaoka, JICA president

Keynote Speech

  • Joseph Stiglitz, Columbia University
  • Helen Clark, President, UNDP
  • Akinwumi Ayodeji Adesina, President, AfD

Panel Discussion

  • Akbar Norman, Colombia University

 

27 Aug 2016: Industrial Development in Africa – KAIZEN and beyond

10:00-12:00, Sarova Panafric Hotel, Nairobi Kenya

Manufacturing plays a key role in the process of economic transformation. Enhancing competitiveness through improving productivity and quality is a key issue in Africa. This seminar will focus on firm-level policies, namely KAIZEN, an important element behind improving firm performances.

Opening remarks: Akiba Kenya (Member of the House of Representatives and Deputy Secretary General, Japan-African Union Parliamentary Friendship Association)

Panel Discussion

  • Dirk Willem te Velde, Head of International Economic Development Group and SET Programme, ODI (Moderator)
  • Dawarnoba Baeka, Chief Director, Ministry of Trade and Industry, Ghana
  • Daniel Kilenge, General Manager, Manufacturing, Quality, ME & Maintenance, General Motors East Africa
  • Kenichi Tomiyoshi, Vice President, JICA
  • John Page, Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution
  • Getahun Tadesse, Director General, Ethiopian Kaizen Institute

Closing remarks: Mayaki Ibrahim, CEO, NEPAD Agency

Click here for JICA press release

28 Aug 2016: Industrialisation, private sector development and economic transformation in Africa: challenges and prosperity

 

13:30-17:00, Hilton Hotel, Nairobi Kenya

In consideration of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) where industrialisation is critically needed in order to transform an over-dependent economic structure on agriculture and mining, this seminar will explore the potential pathways toward the transformation in SSA.

Hiroshi Sato, Institute of Developing Economies (IDE)-JETRO (Moderator)

Speakers

  • Stephen Gelb, Team Leader, Private Sector Development, ODI
  • Takahiro Fukunishi, IDE-JETRO
  • Keijiro Otsuka, Kobe University

Panel Discussion

  • Gerrishon Ikiara, Professor, University of Nairobi
  • Lemma Senbet, Executive Director, African Economic Research Consortium (AERC)
  • Dirk Willem te Velde, Head of International Economic Development Group and SET Programme, ODI

Presentations & Reports

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Stephen Gelb ODI-IDE slides

Dirk Willem te Velde ODI-IDE slides

 

The SET team also held a closed session on 29 August with Government of Kenya, Department for International Development (DFID) Kenya, local and international experts, business representatives and others. The session discussed manufacturing in Kenya and SET support for economic transformation.

31 May 2016 | Supporting Economic Transformation in Nigeria

Overseas Development Institute (ODI), in conjunction with DFID Nigeria publicly launched a new SET paper on Supporting Economic Transformation in Nigeria in Abuja on 31st May 2016. The paper written by Nigerian and international experts draws on international experience from large developing countries that have managed to transform the structure of their economies, as well as the record of economic transformation and economic policy in Nigeria to date, to chart a way forward for Nigeria’s economic transformation efforts.

31 May 2016 | 10:00-14:00 GMT

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Overseas Development Institute (ODI), in conjunction with DFID Nigeria publicly launched a new SET paper on Supporting Economic Transformation in Nigeria in Abuja on 31st May 2016.

The paper written by Nigerian and international experts (including David Booth, Danny Leipziger, Ebere Uneze and Dirk Willem te Velde) draws on international experience from large developing countries that have managed to transform the structure of their economies, as well as the record of economic transformation and economic policy in Nigeria to date, to chart a way forward for Nigeria’s economic transformation efforts.

Key messages

  • Nigeria has so far experienced little economic transformation and low-quality growth. Business as usual is not going to generate the large increase in productive employment that the country needs.
  • Successful transformation elsewhere has been supported by a co-ordinated push through a central agency or ministry pursuing a path of transformation based on openness and competitiveness.
  • In the past Nigeria experienced a persistence of inward-looking policy mind-sets and lack of a shared vision of national development and state-building.
  • The current economic climate and development of the government’s economic plans (including the 2016 budget) provide an ideal opportunity for the government of Nigeria to show it is serious about economic transformation and promote a number of carefully selected projects which demonstrate that progress in export-oriented transformation can be made, contributing to a shared visions of transformation.

The published report and an earlier related brief are now available online.

Speakers and representatives

Dr Aisha Abubakar: Hon Minister of State, Federal Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment (FMITI)

Mr Según Awolowo: Executive Director/CEO, Nigeria Export Promotion Council (NEPC)

Mr Laoye Jaiyeola: CEO Nigeria Economic Summit Group (NESG)

Mr Muda Yusuf: Director General Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI)

Dr Dirk Willem te Velde, Head of International Economic Development Group and Director of SET, ODI

Moderator: Boason Omofaye, Head of Business News on ChannelsTV.

Full summary:

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Media coverage

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Online

Channel S TV, 31 May 2016

Okrote Blogspot, 31 May 2016

Nigerian Times, 31 May 2016

Business Day Online, 1 June 2016

Sarewah, 1 June 2016

Leadership, 2 June 2016

All Africa, 3 June 2016

This Day Live, 3 June 2016

News360, 3 June 2016

Bizwatch Nigeria, 3 June 2016

TechTrendsng, 8 June 2016

Friday Posts, 8 June 2016

African Business Magazine, 6 Feb 2017

Print:

Leadership Newspaper p38 – 2/6/16
The  Authority p8 – 1/6/16
National Mirror p4 – 1/6/16
Nigerian pilot p7 – 1/6/16
People’s Daily p22, 1/6/16
New telegraph p28 – 1/6/16
African Business Magazine – 6/2/17

22 March 2016 | Supporting economic development: learning from success

Kick-starting more inclusive economic development processes in the world’s poorest countries is one of the most important remaining challenges in international development. However, because of the way politics works, it is also one of the most difficult. This is a reason for international development agencies to get involved. But it also means any support must be politically smart. This event examines lessons from two new ODI publications, a report edited by David Booth and co-authored with DFID economists and governance advisers, and an ODI Insights policy brief on economic development.

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22 March 2016 11:30 – 13:00 (GMT+00) | Public event

Kick-starting more inclusive economic development processes in the world’s poorest countries is one of the most important remaining challenges in international development. However, because of the way politics works, it is also one of the most difficult. This is a reason for international development agencies to get involved. But it also means any support must be politically smart. To be politically smart, support to economic development needs to be targeted, flexible and adaptive. It should also be funded at arm’s length, so nationals of the country can lead the main reform effort. Recent initiatives supported by DFID in Nepal and Nigeria show how this approach can be operationalised and illustrate its substantial potential.

This event examines lessons from two new ODI publications, a report edited by David Booth and co-authored with DFID economists and governance advisers, and an ODI Insights policy brief on economic development, and is followed by a networking lunch.

Opening address:

Rt Hon Desmond Swayne TD MP – Minister of State for International Development

Introduced by Marta Foresti – Director of Governance, Security and Livelihoods, ODI

Chair:

Eka Ikpe – Lecturer in Development Economics in Africa, Kings College

Speakers:

Ann Grant – Non-Executive Director, Tullow Oil and ODI board member

David Booth – Senior Research Fellow, ODI

Nick Lea – Deputy Chief Economist, Department for International Development

Alex MacGillivray – Director of Development Impact, CDC

 

Photo credit: Cristiano Zingale, 2014

14-15 March 2016 | ACET African Transformation Forum

In March 2016, the African Center for Economic Transformation (ACET), in partnership with the Government of Rwanda, convened the first African Transformation Forum (ATF) in Kigali, Rwanda. The first objective of the ATF was to facilitate knowledge sharing and peer learning across global and African luminaries from the public and private sectors. The second objective of the ATF was to launch the Coalition for Transformation in Africa, a new leadership network organised in chapters, each addressing a specific thematic area. The SET team collaborated with ACET on background papers to inform discussion sessions on three areas.

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On March 14 to 15, 2016, the African Center for Economic Transformation (ACET), in partnership with the Government of Rwanda, convened the first African Transformation Forum (ATF) in Kigali, Rwanda.

The first objective of the ATF was to facilitate knowledge sharing and peer learning across global and African luminaries from the public and private sectors. These participants contributed their rich insights, and uncover challenges and solutions for galvanizing economic transformation in Africa. The discussions fell into two categories: i) the coordinated development and implementation of national development plans; and ii) catalysing transformation within critical sectors, notably: extractives; light manufacturing; agriculture; skills development; entrepreneurship; financial inclusion; infrastructure; and regional integration.

The second objective of the ATF was to launch the Coalition for Transformation in Africa, a new leadership network organized in chapters, each addressing a specific thematic area. These chapters and the policy makers, business leaders and development partners who will constitute their membership will examine and develop implementable solutions for development. ACET will serve as the Secretariat for the Coalition, building consensus, coordinating activities and assisting the membership in securing funding to support their agreed initiatives. The chapters will also report their progress at subsequent African Transformation Forums.

The SET team has collaborated with ACET on background papers to inform discussion sessions on three areas:

For more information please contact Buddy Buruku, Director, African Transformation Forum: atf@acetforafrica.org

14 January 2016 | Africa’s industrialisation: reversing the decline

Manufacturing plays a key role in the process of economic transformation that is required for high quality growth, job creation and sustained progress. Yet the share of manufacturing in GDP has been falling in Sub-Saharan Africa over the last three decades and was just 11% in 2014. Recent estimates indicate that the role of manufacturing in driving growth and transformation is likely to decline further. John Page joins a panel of experts to explore the challenges and prospects for industrialisation in Africa.The panel will discuss what caused the lack of industrialisation in sub-Saharan Africa and what can be done to improve it.

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Africa’s industrialisation: reversing the decline | Event | Overseas Development Institute (ODI)

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Manufacturing plays a key role in the process of economic transformation that is required for high quality growth, job creation and sustained progress. Yet the share of manufacturing in GDP has been falling in Sub-Saharan Africa over the last three decades and was just 11% in 2014. Recent estimates indicate that the role of manufacturing in driving growth and transformation is likely to decline further. Industrialisation expert John Page links this decline to bad luck and bad policy.

But there are also some positive signs. Manufacturing production has been increasing faster in Sub-Saharan Africa than in the rest of the world, and it now makes up  a greater share in world manufacturing than fifteen years ago. Recently, several Asian firms have set up new manufacturing operations in African special economic zones such as in Ethiopia.

John Page joins a panel of experts to explore the challenges and prospects for industrialisation in Africa.The panel will discuss what caused the lack of industrialisation in sub-Saharan Africa and what can be done to improve it.

 

ODI has undertaken research on industrialisation in the context of a project with JICA on the role of Kaizen and through the SET Programme.

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Facilitator:

Dirk Willem te Velde– Head of International Economic Development Group (IEDG) and Director, Supporting Economic Transformation (SET)

Lead presenter:

John Page – Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution

Discussants:

Nick Lea – Deputy Chief Economist,  DFID

Kimiaki Jin – Chief Representative, JICA Ethiopia

Helen Hai – CEO Huajian Company in Ethiopia, Goodwill Ambassador for UNIDO

Machiko Nissanke – Professor of Economics, SOAS, University of London

Stephen Gelb – Senior Research Fellow Team Leader, Private Sector Development, IEDG, ODI

 

Download panel presentations:

17 December 2015 | Trade Session at WTO Trade and Development Symposium

Economic growth is necessary for development. The increase in the quantity of resources available to produce and/or distribute is essential in the development process. However, economic growth alone does not guarantee all development objectives. The quality of economic growth matters, and it essential for sustained development that growth involves some form of productivity change and economic transformation.

Trade can be a powerful channel to mobilise resources from low to high productivity sectors and to improve productivity within sectors. The Supporting Economic Transformation (SET) programme has explored the links between trade, trade policy and economic transformation. Trade helps to diversify production, discover and develop new productive capabilities and increase domestic value added. Services are becoming increasingly important in world trade and SET has focused on the role of services in economic transformation.

The aim of this workshop is to examine the links between trade (in services) and economic transformation. How have countries been successful in using trade for economic transformation? How can we analyse what sectors are promising for economic transformation? How does services trade affect manufacturing and agriculture development? What are the implications for trade policy?

Agenda for WTO Ministerial Conference
17 December 2015, 11:00-12:30, Hilton Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya

Chair
Dirk Willem te Velde – Senior Research Fellow, ODI – Director, SET

Speakers

Chris Barton – Director of International Affairs, Trade Policy & Export Control (ITEC), UK’s Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS)

Max Mendez-Parra – Research Fellow, ODI/SET

Arancha Gonzalez – Executive Director, ITC

Bernard Hoekman – Director of Global Economics, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies

Frank Matsaert – Chief Executive Officer, TradeMark East Africa

Event page on TDS/ICTSD website can be found here.

Download agenda

Download 10 things you need to know about trade and economic transformation

Download concept note

Download full event report

Download ‘Where next for trade negotiations?’

Download services presentation – Max Mendez Parra

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